Chase Reconsideration Numbers (and Other Banks…)

One of the challenges of applying for new rewards credit cards is dealing with the reconsideration process. Those who apply for many cards at a time — and do so on a regular basis throughout the year — will find that the high number of recent “pulls” on their credit report will cause banks to pause. They will not automatically approve the application and will instead will forward it for a more thorough review by a human.

Sometimes this isn’t a problem. I have only called a reconsideration line once, for a business card, and it was approved. Other than that, all of my “pending” applications have eventually been approved except one. I think that’s a good success rate for letting the process work on its own. But I know I am only moderately insane compared to some of the other points addicts out there. In addition to this post, I’ll be adding the information to my “Credit Cards” tab in the navigation bar above.

I have two tips for handling a reconsideration request. First, be flexible. Chase often analyzes each customer’s profile and assigns a maximum credit limit. Until you reach this they will continue to add to it with each new card. And once you reach it, you can usually get a new card approved just by transferring credit from an existing card.

The second is to know the card you’re applying for. You need to give the representative some reason to believe this is a card you will use — meaning you’ll be paying the annual fee and incurring merchant processing fees. If they think you’re just going to get the bonus and cancel, there is no profit motive for the issuer. Here are some examples for popular Chase cards:

  • Sapphire Preferred — You do a lot of travel and like the bonus categories and good transfer partners.
  • Freedom — You like your Sapphire Preferred, but you need a card with no annual fee. Plus the bonus categories are different.
  • Ink Bold — It’s a great card for business expenses like telecommunications and office supplies, plus it adds to the points you earn with your Sapphire Preferred.
  • Ink Plus — You like your Ink Bold, but you also need an option to spread out your payments over time. This justification is one reason I recommend applying for the Ink Bold (a charge card) before the Ink Plus (a credit card).
  • Hyatt ¬†— This is tricky because its rewards match or are inferior to some other Chase cards you might already have. Tell them you need the Chip + Signature technology for international travel. Or say you plan to spend $40,000 a year to help you get Diamond status.
  • Southwest — Again, not a great one to explain away if you already have other, superior, Chase cards. I might argue that most of your travel is already with Southwest and that this card helps you obtain elite status.
  • United — Use the airline-specific benefits like free checked baggage and priority boarding as your excuse. They probably cost Chase nothing.

Other cards linked to Marriott, IHG Rewards, Fairmont, etc. as well as cards issued by other banks tend to follow one of the models described above. Be confident and act like the sign-up bonus¬†isn’t the reason you’re interested in the card. I leave you with the contact information:

American Express

Application Status: (877) 399-3083
Application Reconsideration: (866) 314-0237
Credit Services: (800) 230-1284
Online Application Status

Bank Of America

Personal Application Status: (877) 721-9405 ext 3
Business Application Status: (800) 481-8277
Online Application Status

*This might also work for Bank of Hawaii, but it’s moot because I haven’t seen any current offers for Hawaiian Airlines credit cards.

Barclays

Credit Analyst: (866)-408-4064
Card Services: (888) 232-0780
Online Application Status

Capital One

Application Services: (800) 625-7866
Application and Card Services: (800) 548-4593

Citi

Personal Application Status and Reconsideration: (800) 695-5171
Personal Application Status: (800) 763-9795
Business Application Status and Reconsideration: (800) 288-4653 ext 3-1
Business Application Status and Reconsideration: (800) 645-7240 ext 3-1
General Account Questions: (866) 606-2787
Cardholder Retention: (800) 444-2568

Mailing Address (last resort):

CitiBank Executive Review Department
PO Box 6000
Sioux Falls, SD 57117

Chase

Personal Application Reconsideration: (888) 245-0625
Business Application Reconsideration: (800) 453-9719

US Bank

Application Status: (800) 947-1444

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Scott created Travel Codex after learning how to travel better on a budget during grad school. He now flies over 150,000 miles every year.
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  • Jay

    Good to see you include Chase #s after every other blogger seemed to curiously remove them a few months ago.

    • Scottrick

      One reason for the posts’s title. The other bank’s numbers are useful, too, but the numbers for Chase are not as widely available.

  • Diamond Vargas

    Any specific intel on why the other blogs pulled the Chase numbers, other than an assumption that Chase asked them to in order to push more traffic to lower-cost customers service channels?

    • Scottrick

      Since Chase doesn’t talk to me, all I have are the same assumptions as everyone else.

    • Demetrius

      Rumor is that Chase threatened to end referral link relationship if they weren’t removed

  • Elenor

    It (okay-so; *I*) may be a bit obsessive, but when I find a great (or really good) blog post with miles/points/travel info, I save the page to my hard drive. Then, when, for instance, Chase tries to hide its recon number? No worries, I have it. Does this clog up my hard drive? Sure, a bit; but I also keep a WordPerfect document in my travel folder(s) called “Various” — into which I pour tidbits and snippets that may be useful when I prepare to travel. (My family’s secret shame, we’re WordPerfect users!! EEK!) (Yes, we clung to Betamax for as long as we could too! Quality before ubiquity!!)

    And yes, I have multiple folders called “Various.wpd” in folders called: flying, rentalcar, Chase, Delta, hotels, portals, Vanilla, United, Bluebird, churning (just added this blog entry to that!), and even a folder called Various: yes, with a file in it called various. It doesn’t take but a second to save good info, and it doesn’t take but a half-minute to search the ‘travel’ folder to find something I dimly remember reading about something that now applies to my plans.

    (Came here from Travel BloggerBuzz, whom I visit over my morning coffee. YAY TBB!)

    • Elaine

      Sounds like you and I would get along! I too came here from TBB although I have been reading HMT for a while and enjoyed meeting Scott when he came to PDX to get a FF meetup group going . Like you, I keep track of blog posts with useful info and my secret shame is I even have a – yikes! – three ring binder where I keep some info, like, for example, recon phone numbers!

      I have actually found the old fashioned binder system to be very helpful. I can keep all the info that I choose to keep that arrives with a new cc there, and when I cycle a card out of my wallet when the minimum spend is met, I just tuck it in with the info on the card’s benefits. Snail-mailed cc offers find their way to the binder too, for reference/use in my next churn, as does info on lounges, hotel perks, ID cards s from FF programs, etc.

      What do the rest of you do with all the stuff that comes in snail mail about your cards and programs? That is, the stuff you keep like lounge passes, etc.? While I know I can google for info and search my hard drive, sometimes finding it in the binder is indeed the fastest!

      • Elenor

        I use a binder system too! I print out a page for each credit card I have — with the number(s) and addresses and the number to call to cancel if stolen, how long each zero percent offer lasts, when I got the card, and so on. And I even find a picture of the card, so I can flip through the pages (I have 8-9 cards?) and find the card by eye if I need to look something up. Each page is in a document protector — so the offer paperwork (or webpage printout of the offer) is kept behind that page. There is also a doc protector for bills — yes I actually still get paper bills! — and once I schedule them for payment (I prefer to do it manually — makes me look over the bill each month!), I write the date, amount, and confirmation no. on the bill, and they go in the doc protector (all-together in one page). Every time I schedule more payments, I weed out the ones that have been paid, and they go in a plastic hanging-file case. Each bill and CC has its own file: the ‘heavy-paper’ that the cards come glued to go in there, as do the various bits-and-bobs of paper the companies send.

        Below that case is another case — which is my traveling and CC info case. There are files for each FF account, for rental car info and offers, for hotel info and offers, for lounge stuff (I have the Ink Bold, so have that Lounge club thingie).

        (Okay-so, I’m actually totally obsessive… I actually have a biz card folder which is where I keep all the FF/etc. cards (whether plastic ones they’ve sent, or ones I’ve made up and printed. When I plan a trip (as I am now to Ft Lauderdale and Key West in Dec), I pull out the cards and info I need and put them all together in a ‘trip folder.’)

        And, on my computer I have a document called “Accounts” — where I keep all my bills and balances, dates, bank accts, etc. etc. updated. (I also just took over my 90-yr-old mom’s stuff, so I have one for her too.) Takes me just a few minutes to keep it updated — takes longer to update the web page I made for her stuff, which is (password-protected and) posted so my mom and my sisters can see her financial condition at a glance. (Got a LOT of great info from Ramit Sethi’s blog and classes on automating and tracking and managing money.)

        • Elaine

          My systems are not quite the same and I do autopay everything since then I needn’t worry when I travel – just got back from a month away – but I too prefer to get paper statements, and I track and make notes much as you do. Nice to find someone else who still has one foot in the 20th century!

  • slumdog007

    I know its slightly off topic but has anyone tried purchasing a gift card at 7-11 with a credit card ? Chase ink gets 2x points at gas stations so I assume purchase at 7-11 might get 2x points too. I couldn’t find any thread on this topic so decided to ask.

    • Scottrick

      An ordinary gift card like for McDonald’s or iTunes? I don’t know. I would rather buy those at an office supply store and get 5X. I know Office Depot still allows this.

      As for other cards, like Vanilla Reloads, you used to be able to buy them at 7-Eleven with a credit card, but not anymore.

      *Also, the gas bonus is generally on purchases at the pump only, not inside the store, but it’s worth checking your statement to confirm.

      • slumdog007

        thanks .. I was asking about buying a regular $ 500 prepaid visa gift card with my chase credit card at 7-11. Office Depot only allows prepaid visa with $ 200 limit. Not cost effective to spend $5000 to earn my sign up bonus on my chase ink card. Regular grocery stores will only get me 1x points where as 7-11 could get me 2x points.

        • Scottrick

          Then I don’t know the answer. I put your odds at 50/50.

  • espkh123

    Well, being 18 doesn’t help with reconsideration.
    They said your accounts are too new.
    All I wanted to do was a balance transfer from a different bank and close the card.
    Oh well.
    Guess I’m stuck with CapOne.
    Mind you my capital one card has 20 dollars on it – no late payments.
    Discover has 300 on it – soon to be 0
    Kohls is 0.
    They said my balance on my discover is too high too.
    650 limit on it.

  • http://www.timfootdale.com/ Tim Footdale

    Great post, put it to use for Ink Plus today.